Translate

Have you ever traveled to a country where you don’t speak your own language? Recently, various tools that can be used to do so have appeared. However, in that situation, Google Translate may have acquired the status as the No. 1 tool.

Google Translate first launched in April 2006, using rule-based machine translation between English and Arabic. Translation between English and Russian followed in December 2006, and the addition of new languages ramped up in 2007. Google Translate has thus passed the 100 languages mark in just under 10 years.

The following 109 languages are supported by Google Translate as of August 2020.

Afrikaans
Albanian
Amharic
Arabic
Armenian
Azerbaijani
Basque
Belarusian
Bengali
Bosnian
Bulgarian
Burmese
Catalan
Cebuano
Chewa
Chinese (Simplified)*
Chinese (Traditional)*
Corsican
Croatian
Czech
Danish
Dutch
English
Esperanto
Estonian
Filipino
Finnish
French
Galician
Georgian
German
Greek
Gujarati
Haitian Creole
Hausa
Hawaiian
Hebrew
Hindi
Hmong
Hungarian
Icelandic
Igbo
Indonesian
Irish
Italian
Japanese
Javanese
Kannada
Kazakh
Khmer
Kinyarwanda
Korean
Kurdish (Kurmanji)
Kyrgyz
Lao
Latin
Latvian
Lithuanian
Luxembourgish
Macedonian
Malagasy
Malay
Malayalam
Maltese
Maori
Marathi
Mongolian
Nepali
Norwegian (Bokmål)
Odia
Pashto
Persian
Polish
Portuguese
Punjabi (Gurmukhi)
Romanian
Russian
Samoan
Scots Gaelic
Serbian
Sesotho
Shona
Sindhi
Sinhala
Slovak
Slovenian
Somali
Spanish
Sundanese
Swahili
Swedish
Tajik
Tamil
Tatar
Telugu
Thai
Turkish
Turkmen
Ukrainian
Urdu
Uyghur
Uzbek
Vietnamese
Welsh
West Frisian
Xhosa
Yiddish
Yoruba
Zulu

To observe, Google has refreshed its breakdown page that shows which highlights are upheld by every language (the new dialects included today are just accessible for composing). There are six different ways Google Translate can bolster a language:

Type: Just utilize your keyboard.

Talk: Have a bilingual discussion.

Snap: Translate pictures of text in an alternate language.

See: Use your telephone’s camera to see moment interpretations.

Compose: Draw letters or characters with your finger.

Disconnected: Get text interpretations without an information association.

The essential models for Google Translate to include another tongue is that it must be a composed language. However, the group additionally requires “a lot of interpretations in the new dialect to be accessible on the web” with the goal that it can use AI, authorized substance, and its Translate Community (more than 3 million individuals have contributed around 200 million made an interpretation of words) so as to offer OK results.

Be that as it may, much in the wake of including another dialect, Google Translate still improves interpretations after some time by improving its calculations and frameworks, just as by gaining from client interpretations with the Translate Community. With International Mother Language day coming up on February 21, Google is approaching clients for help: Just select the dialects you talk, and decide to either interpret phrases all alone or approve existing interpretations. All things considered, what’s the purpose of supporting the 99 percent on the off chance that you can’t publicly support?


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